Monday, September 20, 2010

WALE & MEEK MILLS - FREESTLYE IN THE STREETS

KC AND JOJO SHOW ON SOBERING UP

Q-TIP, ROOTS, CURRENSY


Q-Tip w/The Roots & Curren$y - Lets Ride (Live Chicago) from Cam Be on Vimeo.
Friday, September 10, 2010

NIPSEY - RUN THIS TOWN FREE STYLE

LIL BOOSIE "LAST DAYZ PART 3"

BIRDMAN (BUN B AND JEZZY) JEWELS

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

SOME MIS-EDUCATION HAILE SELASSIE

The facts of his life are well known. Haile Selassie's influence on the world is his most enduring legacy. Born Tafari Makonnen in 1891, Haile Selassie came to be identified inextricably with Ethiopia. Only rarely in the modern world does the story of a man become so closely linked to the story of a nation. It is said that great events beget great men, but they beget failures as well, and the boundary between the two is often defined by singular acts of courage. These the Ethiopian Emperor did not lack.




Not surprisingly, the fortitude of the man sometimes referred to as "The Lion" inspired Nelson Mandela, Martin Luther King and even Malcom X, each of whom corresponded with Haile Selassie --who advocated civil disobedience when it was necessary to remedy fundamental social injustice or restore freedom to the oppressed. The Emperor's presence at President Kennedy's funeral is still remembered. It seems somehow appropriate that the motion picture Born Free was filmed in Ethiopia during Haile Selassie's reign.



One speaks of leaders of men as though their public lives were completely divorced from their private ones. For a hereditary monarch, this should not be the case. What his children think of him is as important as what everybody else thinks. Haile Selassie was a devoted husband and father. His wife, Empress Menen, died in 1962. His sons, Sahle Selassie, Makonnen, and Asfa Wossen, had a great sense of duty to their father and to their people. Of his daughters, Princess Tenagne, in particular, excercised various official duties.



Haile Selassie ascended the throne in the era of polar exploration and slow communication. Africa's oldest nation was little more than a footnote to the great stories of the day --something that Americans and Brits read about in the pages of the National Geographic. Some people still called the country Abyssinia. In certain countries far beyond Ethiopia's borders, segregation and apartheid were long established and little questioned. Most other African "nations" were colonies. Even at home, slavery was technically still legal.

In such an era, words like "pan-Africanism" and "civil rights" were little more than esoteric p


ARAB MUZIK AND BUSTA RYHMES IN THE STUDIO

ASHER ROTH = GRIND TIME INTERVIEW

CEE-LO GREEN FUCK YOU VIDEO

WOMEN IN HIP HOP BET SPECIAL

PRESIDENT OBAMA ENDS WAR

THRILL TUBE

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